The Constitutional Convention Debate and Compromise Interactive Presentation

$3.00

Subject
Social Studies – History, Civics, U.S. History
Grade Levels
6th, 7th, 8th, 9th
Resource Type
Activities, Handouts, Internet Activities
File Type
Zip (1 MB|3 pg. handout + 21 slides + 2 pg. lesson plan)

Pages:

Products Included in This Bundle:

Description

The Constitutional Convention can be very confusing for students. Students struggle with conceptualizing the debates and compromises relating to the formation of the U.S. government. With this lesson, I’ve created a straightforward presentation that helps students to focus on the basics of the Constitutional Convention – what were the found fathers debating? How did they come to a compromise? I’ve included both the Connecticut (Great) Compromise and the 3/5’s Compromise.

To make sure that students clearly understand the lesson being presented, I’ve created a clearly written presentation with formative assessment questions built write in! Students can answer the questions with a web-based program called Pear Deck (tutorial provided) or within class discussion. You can view more in the preview here.

This lesson includes a three-page handout for students will all the information from the presentation, a 21 slide presentation with built-in assessment questions and a 2-page lesson plan.

If you would prefer to use this lesson digitally, but not use Pear Deck, I’ve also provided directions as to how to turn this lesson into a simple Google Slides lesson. (You can see these directions in the preview on page 3.)

© Copyright 2020 Peacefield History. All rights reserved. Permission is granted to copy pages specifically designed for student or teacher use by the original purchaser or licensee. This is intended to be used by one teacher unless additional licenses have been purchased. The reproduction of any other part of this product is strictly prohibited. Copying any part of this product and placing it on the Internet in any form besides Google Classroom is strictly forbidden. Doing so makes it possible for an Internet search to make the document available on the Internet, free of charge, and is a violation of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA).

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